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Posted: Oct 23, 2018
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Author: Lou Grilli

Security For Your PCI Reports

A typical credit union downloads its report bundles daily from its processors. Usually, the only option is to store those highly sensitive Payment Card Industry (PCI) report bundles on a network drive, with some level of appropriate user access controls. The reports contain 16-digit card numbers, transaction-level details, and Personally Identifiable Information (PII) of credit union members. However, the network drive is not in a PCI compliant environment. Does this sound familiar? More importantly, do you know where your processor reports are being stored?

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Posted: Oct 11, 2018
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Author: Lou Grilli

U.S. Bank becomes the first financial institution subject to OCC supervision to offer “deposit advance products” a.k.a. Payday Loans. Should credit unions step up to help the community?

U.S. Bank, the country’s largest regional bank, began taking advantage of a roll-back of OCC regulations that prohibited banks from offering deposit advance products. According to the LA Times, a U.S. Bank customer with a checking account open for more than 6 months, and a direct deposited paycheck can apply online and if approved, be granted a loan of between $100 and $1,000, within minutes. Repayment, which must be within three months, comes with an interest rate of $12 per $100 borrowed, which calculates to nearly a 71% annualized interest rate. U.S. Bank is just the first of what is expected to be a wave of banks providing competition to payday lenders. What changed to bring this on?

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Posted: Oct 3, 2018
Comments: 0
Author: Lou Grilli

The stakes are high - $90 billion in fees paid collectively by merchants each year, according to Bloomberg. The proposed class action settlement amount is record-breaking - $6.2 billion, the most significant dollar amount ever, to be paid to 12 million merchants who do not opt-out of the settlement.

What does this mean for the future of interchange fees? It’s still murky, at best.

A lawsuit that was being argued since 2005 was finally settled on September 18, 2018, some 13 years later. The class action was initially filed by the National Retail Federation, the Retail Industry Leaders Association, and the National Association of Convenience Stores, collectively representing about 12 million merchants in the U.S. It named Visa, Mastercard, and several large issuers, including JPMorgan Chase & Co., Citigroup Inc. and Bank of America Corp. as Defendants. The suit accuses the defendants of conspiring to fix interchange fees that businesses pay to process credit and debit cards. A previous settlement had been reached in 2012 but was thrown out by the courts. This time around, the settlement, which still needs to be approved by the courts, leaves open several unanswered issues.

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