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Posted: Feb 7, 2019
Comments: 0
Author: Randy Daigle

CECL is One of Them

So, you can now breathe a little easier, just a little, with the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) officially delaying Current Expected Credit Loss (“CECL”) implementation to fiscal years beginning after December 2021. Basically, the credit union will need to move from estimating Allowance Loan and Lease Losses (“ALLL”) based on averages of historical losses (that is, looking in the rear-view mirror) to developing future predictive models to estimate loan losses and to set loss reserves in 2022. This must be done for each individual loan booked, on the day the loan closes, and ongoing throughout the loan.

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Posted: Dec 13, 2018
Categories: Regulations, Consulting
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Trellance’s Compliance Corner, a thought leadership spotlight on topics relevant to compliance officers and credit union executives, has covered a lot of ground in 2018.

Back in January, we noted that Reg Z fees, which dictate the maximum a credit union can charge for penalty fees, such as late fees,  remained the same from 2017.

In March, we covered CECL, or Current Expected Credit Loss, a new accounting standard which will result in most credit unions increasing loan loss reserves by looking forward and predicting the potential for write-offs. This is an area where data analytics can help credit union executives make more accurate predictions, thus lowering the need for high reserves.

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Posted: Mar 6, 2018
Categories: Regulations, Consulting
Comments: 0

ThePaymentsReview continues a new feature that occasionally highlights regulatory topics important to credit unions.

Accounting for loan losses is at the heart of credit union accounting. Setting aside reserves for loan losses is an important accounting component, but an increase in allowances reduces a credit union’s capital. Under current accounting standards, a credit union recognizes losses when they reach a probable threshold of loss. This is called an incurred loss accounting model. In practical terms, incurred loss accounting is a backwards-looking model, measuring a pool of loans against historic annualized write-offs. This method can drastically underrepresent potential future losses when a loan portfolio is exposed to a financial crisis, especially after a run of several years with lower losses. And this is exactly what happened following the financial crisis of 2008 in which some credit unions found themselves under reserved and unprepared for losses in their loan and mortgage portfolios while losses to their investments, and in many cases, shares declined. In the rising economy of the early 2000’s, losses were not being accounted for as “probable”.

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